Introduction

The ground beneath the publishing industry trembled in 2007, when Amazon released the Kindle and Apple released the iPhone. Digital—which had wrought havoc on the music and newspaper industries—was finally coming to the consumer market for books. Certainly digital had been reshaping reading, and much of what we call “publishing” since at least the 1970s, but for the mass market, 2007 was when the general population started to consider that “books” might come in pixels rather than pages. In the few years since, these devices and their spawn have brought digital reading of long-form text from the realm of “it might happen sometime” to “it is happening right now,” and faster than anyone predicted. Many questions have been answered, resoundingly: Will readers read ebooks? Yes. Lots? Yes. Dedicated reading devices, or smartphones, or tablets? Doesn’t matter, as long as there is cross-device accessibility. Browser reading? See previous. Shakeup in publishing? Sorta, but the sky is still overhead.

That rapid shakeup—from print to digital buying and reading—has been massive, but it’s really only a transitional phase to a radically different future.

Just a Shift?

We used to live in a paper-based model: Publishers sent print books to distributors and retailers, who sold print books to readers, who took those books home or to work and read them when and where they liked.

We are now effectively replicating this model for digital: Publishers send digital files to distributors and retailers, who sell those files to readers, who download them onto various devices and read them when and where they like.

Of course much else has happened. Pricing structures have changed (the 99-cent best-seller, as well as the agency model), the barriers to entry have crumbled (Bowker estimates 2.8 million print-on-demand and self-published print books came into being in 2010, versus an estimated 270,000 traditionally published books; Smashwords currently distributes some 30,000 ebook authors and 80,000 titles), and the role of the publisher in this disintermediated world is in question (crime writer Joe Konrath claims he does much better without a traditional publisher, and Amanda Hocking sold more than a million copies of her self-published paranormal novel through Kindle, and then went on to sign a multi-book deal with St. Martin’s Press).

Or a Fundamental Restructuring?

But there is a greater shift afoot than just pricing and delivery mechanisms, and that is what this book aims to explore. We want to examine how digital changes the process of making a book, as well as what we do with it afterwards.

The move to digital is not just a format shift, but a fundamental restructuring of the universe of publishing. This restructuring will touch every part of a publishing enterprise—or at least most publishing enterprises. Shifting to digital formats is “part one” of this changing universe; “part two” is what happens once everything is digital. This is the big, exciting unknown.

What happens when all books are truly digital, connected, ubiquitous? We’re starting to put the infrastructure in place now, so we can start doing things with books that have never before been possible.

What’s In the Book?

This book is meant to be a guidebook for the future—a collection of essays from thought leaders and practitioners about the bleeding edge of publishing. We’ve organized it in three parts:

Part 1. The Setup: Approaches to the Digital Present

In this section, we explore what digital means right now for publishers, and how we need to rethink critical practical matters like design, metadata, and workflow, as well as the underlying assumptions about what a book is and what the job of a publisher might be.

Part 2: The Outlook: What Is Next for the Book?

In this section, we explore that jump into the unknown, the next phase of the “digital book.” Here we look at all kinds of exotic things we can start to do with books once we truly think of them as connected, digital objects, rather than just digital copies of paper objects.

Part 3: The Things We Can Do with Books: Projects from the Bleeding Edge

In this section, we hear from some of those brave souls who have already plunged into the future: those who do more than think and write and talk about “the future of the book,” those who have some skin in the game, with projects, passions, technologies, and enterprises struggling to explore the future now.

Inspired by those leading the charge, this book will also practice what it preaches—it is being written and edited using a new web-based book-production system, PressBooks.com (full disclosure, I am the founder of PressBooks).  In fact this book was conceived as an experiment, to test out new kinds of production methods as we wrote the book. So while we’ve been writing and editing this book, we’ve also been building the book-making tool upon which it was written, edited, and from which comes the EPUB, print and web versions of the book.

We are also encouraging reader feedback throughout the writing process. The book is available for free online at http://book.pressbooks.com as well as in other formats for sale from O’Reilly, and major online retailers.

This book, like all books, is meant to start a conversation, to be part of a conversation. Feedback is encouraged. We may well be missing topics we should not have missed. We might spend too much time on the wrong topics, and we could get things wrong. But nothing is permanent, and everything is connected. Comments on what we have written or should have written help flesh out this complex discussion that surrounds all of us in publishing. We hope this book will be useful as a point of departure for thinking about what publishing can be.


You can continue reading on the web, and add your comments here:http://book.pressbooks.com/front-matter/introduction

15 Responses to Introduction

  1. Kathrin Passig on October 27, 2011 at 5:12 pm says:

    There should be a more prominent link to the next chapter at the end of the introduction. I almost went away, thinking that maybe the introduction was the only part published yet. It took me several minutes to find the little arrows. I don’t know a better solution, though. But since the reader expects this book not to be finished yet, it should be clearer where it does end (and where it doesn’t). Maybe some sort of Kindle-style progress bar would help, or maybe you could show the full table of contents at the top right instead of just the link.

  2. Hugh McGuire on November 1, 2011 at 4:24 pm says:

    Hi Kathrin, thanks for the note … I’ve added a link at the bottom of the intro. Thanks & we’ll think about how to make the UI more clear.

  3. Dominic Jodoin on November 3, 2011 at 1:24 am says:

    Hi,

    I would like to know under what license is the content of the book available (if any)?

    Thanks!

  4. bob young on November 3, 2011 at 1:29 am says:

    “…The ground beneath the publishing industry trembled in 2007…”

    Why 2007? seems like a very late date to use.

    Reading has been moving from paper to electronic reading platforms since the invention of the web in the ’90s and arguably earlier.
    Large parts of the publishing industry has been earning substantial and growing revenues selling electronic reading material since LexisNexis in the ’70’s.

    Tthe very public launch of the Kindle (and now Nook, IPad, and Android-based devices) did make reading fiction electronically easier than it had been. But fiction is just one, late-to-the-party, sector of the publishing industry.

    • Hugh McGuire on November 3, 2011 at 1:58 am says:

      @bob a fair point. the shift was certainly later in the consumer market compared with others — and not just fiction, but much of trade, academic etc. o’reilly’s experience, for instance, is a huge surge of digital sales in the last three years, so that now digital outstrips print. that is new for them, and the 20% sales etc that we are seeing elsewhere is new as well. … so yes, reading has been digital (predominantly probably) for many many years, but publishers of long-form texts (aka books) are entering a digital world that substantially shifts, for many of the ones I talk to, how they expect to be doing business in the next 5 years and beyond.

  5. Hugh McGuire on November 3, 2011 at 1:42 am says:

    @dominic: the authors all own the copyrights on their chapters.

  6. Hugh McGuire on November 3, 2011 at 1:52 am says:

    @bob a fair point. the shift was certainly later in the consumer market compared with others — and not just fiction, but much of trade, academic etc. o’reilly’s experience, for instance, is a huge surge of digital sales in the last three years, so that now digital outstrips print. that is new for them, and the 20% sales etc that we are seeing elsewhere is new as well. … so yes, reading has been digital (predominantly probably) for many many years, but publishers of long-form texts (aka books) are entering a digital world that substantially shifts, for many of the ones I talk to, how they expect to be doing business in the next 5 years and beyond.

  7. ptr on November 3, 2011 at 4:49 pm says:

    Screen after screen after screen of grey type is really unpleasant to read. Contrast increases clarity – this would be less dull, visually, set in pure black type.

    • Hugh McGuire on November 3, 2011 at 5:00 pm says:

      hi ptr, thanks for the comment. we’ve focused mainly on clarity in pressbooks backend, good structure for the “book”, and well-structured export formats (epub, typeset pdf, and web). what the books look like — that is the presentation layer on the various structured outputs — are “next steps.”

  8. R. Scot Johns (@RScotJohns) on November 26, 2011 at 12:36 am says:

    I see you mentioned to ptr that presentation is a “next step,” but I thought I’d offer just a few quick notes on the downloaded e-reader files as I progress, since the notes here so far seem to be about the online version.

    Both ePub and mobi formats condense the “About the Book” section into one solid block of text on the Kindle 3, Kindle Fire, iPad 2 and ADE for PC. Bullet points are lost amid the wall of text without being indented or separated out.

    Internal links function correctly on all platforms, but external links are non-functional on the Kindle Fire. Elsewhere external links work fine.

    On the Kindle Fire, the Title Page has an ugly hyphen break in the work “Manifesto” which renders it somewhat less than pleasant. The text here would also look better centered.

    The remainder of the Intro “proper” is well formatted in mobi with indents, sections, and headers, but the ePub edition converts everything to web-style block paragraphs with no indents and spaces between.

    I’m sure you’re aware of all this, but I thought I’d mention it just in case, and let you know that someone out here is paying attention.

    Exciting read so far. Looking forward to the rest.

  9. Hugh McGuire on November 27, 2011 at 2:44 am says:

    thanks for the formatting comments… we’ve got some new CSS’s for ebooks …

  10. thomasr on December 14, 2011 at 12:48 pm says:

    This book is a document in progress, with feedback before, during and after publication. When is the best time to apply an ISBN? It seems to me that an ISBN sets something in stone, to put it on record. Or to mark an edition format type. But how do you see it applying to a fluid digital book(s) project like this one?
    Great book and PressBooks website, by the way!
    Thomas

  11. Baron Schwartz on July 17, 2012 at 4:52 pm says:

    “Digital—which had wrought havoc on the music and newspaper industries”

    Just a nitpick: the past tense of wreak is wreaked. Maybe you meant it this way — it isn’t quite wrong, after all. See http://www.randomhouse.com/wotd/index.pperl?date=20000404

    I usually try to avoid “wreak havoc” in any tense for exactly this pedantic reason :)

    • Yves Monsel on July 11, 2013 at 5:41 am says:

      @Hervé Yes, as a non-native I spent a few minutes to figure out this. ;-)

  12. Hervé on October 2, 2012 at 5:29 am says:

    I just finished reading the first two chapters and think I will keep this book close at hand for a long time : not only it does resonate with my current work for a French publisher aspiring going digital, but I do believe this brilliant thinking applies to other “industries”. Great work.

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